top of page

Watch or listen now on YouTube, Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and RSS!

Watch or listen now on YouTube, Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and RSS!

Watch or listen now on YouTube, Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and RSS!

Watch or listen now on YouTube, Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and RSS!

Chapter 4-5

Chapters 4 and 5 in the Book of Revelation describe John's vision of Celestial Paradise in the postmortal spirit world as of the time John had his vision on Patmos Island in approximately 96 AD.  John Cassinat has published nine (9) podcasts for the individual verses in chapter 4 and four (4) podcasts for the individual verses in chapter 5. These verse-by-verse podcasts can be accessed from this page by clicking on the image or podcast title listed below. Each podcast title includes a section number [§], which corresponds to the section number in The Book of Revelation Doctrinal Commentary: Unveiling Jesus Christ, where John Cassinat explains the content of the same verses. 

Watch or listen now on YouTube, Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and RSS!

  • Youtube
  • Spotify
  • Apple Music
  • RSS
maxresdefault (14).jpg

This podcast provides an overview of chapter 4 in the Book of Revelation with an emphasis on the meaning of the word heaven. This podcast explains that heaven is synonymous with celestial paradise in the postmortal spirit world where the spirits of the righteous and just go to await their resurrection into the celestial kingdom. In this chapter John sees celestial paradise as of 96 AD, which is the date of his vision on Patmos island. Various reasons and explanations are given as to why this is not a vision of the celestial kingdom for resurrected persons.

maxresdefault (15).jpg

This podcast explains John’s vision of paradise in Revelation 4:1, where he was beckoned by the voice of Jesus Christ to come up hither through an open door leading to heaven. The symbols of this verse are interpreted including the voice that sounds like a trumpet and the meaning of “things which must be hereafter.”

maxresdefault (16).jpg

This podcast explains the meaning of the symbols in John’s vision of paradise in Revelation 4:2-3. John sees these symbolic images while “in the Spirit.” The images include a throne set in heaven on which God the Father is seated. His glory is described in symbolic term as a jasper and a sardine stone. There was also an emerald-colored rainbow round about the throne, representing life and the mercy of God.

maxresdefault (17).jpg

This podcast discusses and explains the symbols used by John the Revelator in his vision of paradise in Revelation 4:4, including the symbol of the throne of God surrounded by 24 seats (thrones). These thrones were occupied by 24 Elders clothed in white raiment and crowns of gold on their head to represent their exaltation-worthy status in paradise.

maxresdefault (18).jpg

This podcast explains the symbols used by John to describe the throne of God in heaven that John saw in Revelation 4:5, including the lightnings, thunderings, and voices that John saw and heard. His verse also includes the images of seven lamps of fire burning before the throne, which are the seven Spirits of God. These seven spirits are the same seven spirits from Revelation 1:4, which represent the seven leaders from the seven churches of Asia following their mortal deaths.

maxresdefault (19).jpg

This podcast discusses the symbolic meaning of the images described by John the Revelator in Revelation 4:6, including the images of the throne of God that stood before the sea of glass like unto crystal. This podcast sets forth various reasons why John’s vision in this verse refers to paradise in the postmortal spirit world where disembodied spirits go to prepare and wait for their resurrection rather than the celestial kingdom of resurrected persons.

sddefault.jpg

This podcast explains the symbolic images used by John to describe paradise in heaven in Revelation 4:6-8. These images include the four beasts who represent all of creation. They are full of eyes before and behind representing their intelligence and omniscience to see things past, present, and future. The beasts (or living creatures more accurately) have symbolic faces of a lion, a calf, a man, and a flying eagle. Their power of movement and ability to carry out the works of God was represented by the six wings on each image. The beasts were also full of eyes within representing their power to discern their own eternal destiny.

maxresdefault (20).jpg

This podcast discusses and explains the symbolic images of John the Revelator in Revelation 4:8-10. The images include the “Four Beasts” that rest not day and night as they utter the trisagion (holy, holy, holy) to God the Father seated on the throne in paradise. He is declared to be the “Lord God Almighty, which was, and is, and is to come.” After the Four Beast glorified God, the 24 Elders (representing exaltation-worthy saints) also fell down or prostrated themselves before the Father and cast their thrones toward God in homage and respect for the Father’s creative enterprises.

maxresdefault (21).jpg

This podcast explains the symbolism and meaning of John the Revelator’s vision found in Revelation 4:11. This last verse in Revelation chapter 4 explains why the Four Beasts and 24 Elders in this chapter are worshiping God the Father as the ultimate source of all creations in the universe.

maxresdefault (22).jpg

This podcast explains the meaning and imagery of John the Revelator in Revelation 5:1-4. In these verses, John’s vision of celestial paradise continues from Revelation 4, but now he sees God the Father on the throne with a book (scroll) in his right hand having seven seals. The meaning of the scroll and its seven seals is discussed in detail as well as the meaning of the strong angel who asks the question of who is worthy to open the book and loose the seals. No man was worthy to do so, because only a God (Jesus Christ) had that power.

maxresdefault (23).jpg

This podcast explains the meaning of the symbols used by John the Revelator from his vision in Revelation 5:5-7. These verses are a continuation of John’s vision of paradise in the postmortal spirit world that began in Revelation 4. In Revelation 5:1-5, John saw a book with seven seals and he wept because he could not find any man to break the seals and open the book. John is now told that the “Lion of the tribe of Juda, the Root of David” (Jesus Christ) had power to do so. He then saw a Lamb that stood in the midst of paradise as though he was slain, but was very much alive. The Lamb represents Jesus Christ. He had seven horns and eyes, representing his omniscience and omnipotent. Christ takes the book from the right hand of God the Father and prepares to open the book.

maxresdefault.jpg

This podcast explains the symbols in John’s vision from Revelation 5:8-10. In these verses, John takes the book with seven seals from the hand of God the Father. When he does so, the Four Beasts and 24 Elders immediately prostrate themselves before Christ and worship him as the redeemer. The 24 Elders four and twenty elders also have harps, and golden vials full of odours, which are the prayers of saints. The 24 Elders also sing a new song extolling the virtues of his sacrifice to redeem all of creation from every kindred, and tongue, and people, and nation. They once again proclaim how Christ has made them kings and priests that will rule on earth commencing with the millennium.

maxresdefault (1).jpg

This podcast explains the symbolism from John’s vision of celestial paradise and beyond in Revelation 5:11-14. In these verses, John beheld the voices of 100 million angels, plus thousands and thousands more who praised Christ for his atonement and the work of his redemption. These 100+ million angels were outside the inner circles of worshipers that included the 24 Elders (exaltation-worthy spirits) and the Four Beasts (representing four classes of creation). The 100+ million angels exist in spirit prison of the postmortal spirit world as of the time of John’s vision of heaven in 96 AD, from all reaches of the universe including all worlds created and redeemed by Christ. These angels proclaim a seven-fold doxology in their praise of Jesus Christ. The Four Beast say “Amen” as an expression of agreement and ratification of worship by the 24 Elders and the 100+ million angels.

  • Instagram
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Spotify
  • Youtube
  • Apple Music
  • RSS
bottom of page